Dog Ear #SOL20

A dog ear! (2)Fun fact: Did you know that the term “dog ears” (for a book’s page corner to be folded over) dates back to at least 1799? Click here to learn more!

***********************************************

Many thanks to the crew at Two Writing Teachers, and the extended SOL community, for giving us the time, space, and encouragement to live the writerly life here each Tuesday and every day in March. Won’t you join us? My #OLW for 2020 is CREATE. I’m looking forward to nudging myself to create new and different things this year. How about you?

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-2-05-35-pm

The Vortex #SOL20

IMG_1535

I look up from my work and there you are

Still

So many choices at the end of the day

Yet you choose to stay

To create

To explore

To write

You are only six

Have you already discovered Louisa May’s vortex?

***********************************************

Many thanks to the crew at Two Writing Teachers, and the extended SOL community, for giving us the time, space, and encouragement to live the writerly life here each Tuesday and every day in March. Won’t you join us? My #OLW for 2020 is CREATE. I’m looking forward to nudging myself to create new and different things this year. How about you?

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-2-05-35-pm

The “January Thaw” Has Begun #SOL20

Kindergarteners arrive at my door in September. Some know letters and sounds, and some don’t. Very few have written more than their name, mom, dad, cat, and dog.

They come to school day after day. Mini lessons happen. Mentor texts are shared. Mentor authors are discussed. They practice. We confer. They practice some more, and we confer some more. Little by little progress is made. The process reminds me of the classic Pete Seeger garden song, “Inch by Inch” — Inch by inch/Row by row/Gonna make this garden grow/Gonna mulch it deep and low/Gonna make it fertile ground.” (Click here to listen and watch.) Sometimes threads from the work we are doing outside of Writer’s Workshop slowly weave their way into their thoughts and out into their writing. We spend a lot of time outdoors learning about the animals that make their home here on our campus. We also watch birds and other creatures through our classroom window and on our school wildlife camera that captures their movements at night under our feeder station. (Click here to watch. It’s pretty cool to see who visits!) It’s not unusual for these animals to make an appearance in student writing from time to time, in addition to their science observation notebooks.

And then January rolls around, and something begins to happen. I call it the “January thaw.” It’s when all of a sudden things start to make sense and come together. It’s when magic happens, just like it did today for one of my Kindergarten boys.

IMG_1422
Once upon a time there was a fox in the forest.
IMG_1423
“Snow,” he said. “I love snow!”
IMG_1424
Fox ran to find his friends.
IMG_1425
“Hear it snowing?” Fox said. “It’s fun!”
IMG_1426
“Bear! Bird! It’s snowing. It’s fun!,” said Bear. (Fox)
IMG_1427
Then he went to sleep.

Magic. Pure magic.

***********************************************

Many thanks to the crew at Two Writing Teachers, and the extended SOL community, for giving us the time, space, and encouragement to live the writerly life here each Tuesday and every day in March. Won’t you join us? My #OLW for 2020 is CREATE. I’m looking forward to nudging myself to create new and different things this year. How about you?

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-2-05-35-pm

A scary Slice in three parts #SOL19

Warning: some images are not for the faint of heart

bear scuff marks

leaf litter claw scratches cause one to pause

Bear scat

adjacent calling card announces recent visit

pine hill.jpg

uphill drumlin scan reveals erratics and a pounding heart

***********************************************

Many thanks to the crew at Two Writing Teachers, and the extended SOL community, for giving us the time, space, and encouragement to live the writerly life here each Tuesday and every day in March. Won’t you join us? My OLW for 2020 is CREATE. I’m looking forward to nudging myself to create new and different things this year, such as this SLICE using images and very few words to capture experience and emotion.

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-2-05-35-pm

Do you have something for… #SOL19

“Do you have something for a 3-year old girl and a 5-year old boy?” The look of sadness in the man’s eyes broke my heart. He was a client of our local food pantry where my husband and I were volunteering, and he had somehow missed the deadline for requesting sponsorship for Christmas gifts for his grandchildren. It was a quick turn around this year, with Thanksgiving and Christmas falling so close to one another, and distribution day just two days before the holiday.

“How about this sweet baby doll for the girl, and a new backpack filled with school supplies for the boy. And we have some lovely hand-knitted hat, glove, and scarf sets here from the church knitting group. Let’s find some nice colors for them, shall we?”

It was only 10:30 on the morning of December 23rd, but as far as I was concerned, that was Christmas right there.

***********************************************

Many thanks to the crew at Two Writing Teachers, and the extended SOL community, for giving us the time, space, and encouragement to live the writerly life here each Tuesday and every day in March. Won’t you join us?

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-2-05-35-pm

Which Line to Read First #SOL19

 

“Mrs. Wyman! Can you come here? We have a question about some words in the book we are reading.”

This request came from one of my Kindergarten readers during partner reading time during Reading Workshop this morning.

“We were wondering if we could read these words (pointing to the second line of text) before these words (pointing to the first line of text), because it makes way more sense.”

At the store

we get some milk.

“Tell me more,” I asked.

“Well, it’s just that when we talk, we would say, ‘We get some milk at the store.’ ”

This book was a typical patterned emergent reader, with the pattern alternated a few pages in. My two new readers had not only read the text correctly, but were trying to make sense of it. How could I possibly ask for more than that!

***********************************************

Many thanks to the crew at Two Writing Teachers, and the extended SOL community, for giving us the time, space, and encouragement to live the writerly life here each Tuesday and every day in March. Won’t you join us?

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-2-05-35-pm