Day 22: Equation Poem #NaPoWriMo #playwithpoetryNPM

PLAYING WITH POETRY (1)

My #NaPoWriMo Poem-A-Day project is Playing With Poetry. I am tagging along with Margaret Simon, Jone MacCulloch, Molly Hogan, and Mary Lee Hahn. We will be playing with Haikubes, Magnetic Poetry, Metaphor Dice, and Paint Chip Poetry (I raided Home Depot).  I’m even throwing in nail polish color names as inspiration, just for fun! Play along, if you’d like! We are using the Twitter hashtag #playwithpoetryNPM to see what poetic mischief everyone is getting into.

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wood frog eggs + warm weather = backstroke

A peek into my poem and process:

  • Today’s poem is an equation poem. We’ve been enjoying Laura Purdie Salas’ new book, Snowman – Cold = Puddle: Spring Equations in our classroom this spring. We’ve even been trying our hand at our own equation poems. You can read more about Laura, her book, and this fun form here. (P.S. I’m excited to present at NCTE in Baltimore with Laura at a Wonderopolis-sponsored poetry roundtable! I hope you’ll come and see us!)
  • Last week we were on April Vacation. Our biologist-in-residence delayed giving us the wood frog eggs we are to head-start in our classroom, because she didn’t want them to hatch while we were away. She kept them in a safe trap in the vernal pool on our campus until we returned.
  • Last night our science coordinator sent us an UH-OH email saying it was so warm last week and over the weekend, that the eggs hatched! Our poor biologist had to gather up tadpoles from the vernal pool in her gorgeous hip waders. That must have been like herding cats! The subject line in the email read: “Warm Weather Plus Wood Frog Eggs Equals…” I couldn’t resist using it in an equation poem!

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And now for….

2019 Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem

On April 1, the Poetry Friday family launched the 7th annual Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem organized by author/poet, Irene Latham. (Click here to learn more.) Many of us have signed up to provide a line for the 2019 poem. Author/poet Matt Forrest Esenwine kicked things off with some familiar “found” phrases merged to get us going. Today’s line comes from Catherine at Reading to the CoreYou may find her line here on her blog. Participants are having fun song lyrics. I was excited to provide the 14th line on April 14th. You can read it here. I hope you’ll join us to see what happens next! Here’s the itinerary for the rest of the poem.

April

1 Matt @Radio, Rhythm and Rhyme

2 Kat @Kathryn Apel

3 Kimberly @KimberlyHutmacherWrites

4 Jone @DeoWriter

5 Linda @TeacherDance

6 Tara @Going to Walden

7 Ruth @thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown

8 Mary Lee @A Year of Reading

9 Rebecca @Rebecca Herzog

10 Janet F. @Live Your Poem

11 Dani @Doing the Work that Matters

12 Margaret @Reflections on the Teche

13 Doraine @Dori Reads

14 Christie @Wondering and Wandering

15 Robyn @Life on the Deckle Edge

16 Carol @Beyond LiteracyLink

17 Amy @The Poem Farm

18 Linda @A Word Edgewise

19 Heidi @my juicy little universe

20 Buffy @Buffy’s Blog

21 Michelle @Michelle Kogan

22 Catherine @Reading to the Core

23 Penny @a penny and her jots

24 Tabatha @The Opposite of Indifference

25 Jan @Bookseestudio

26 Linda @Write Time

27 Sheila @Sheila Renfro

28 Liz @Elizabeth Steinglass

29 Irene @Live Your Poem

30 Donna @Mainely Write

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Day 19: List and Borrowed Line Poems #NaPoWriMo #playwithpoetryNPM #PoetryFriday

PLAYING WITH POETRY (1)

It’s Poetry Friday! My dear poetry and notebook-keeping mentor, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, is hosting the round up this week. I do hope you will visit her at The Poem Farm, and lots of other PF participants throughout the upcoming week. In addition to her sweet (and often sad) poem project about John and Betsy, Amy offers up a bit of “how to advice” for writing list poems, the form which her poem takes today. My Kindergarten poets love writing list poems, so I have been working on one, too, with different words for walking that I have been collecting.

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— Christie Wyman, 2019 (draft)

 

And now for more playing with poetry!

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A collaborative poem written by Margaret Simon and her students.

Yesterday my #playwithpoetry playmate Margaret Simon honored me by borrowing a line from my haiku I shared on Wednesday. (Click here to see her original post.) Today I am repaying the favor by borrowing a line from a collaborative poem she wrote with her students — “In the spring-sprinkled garden.”

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I turned to one of my #playwithpoetry tools, magnetic poetry, for the rest of the poem.
In the spring-sprinkled garden
In the spring-sprinkled garden” appears courtesy of Margaret Simon and friends.

A peek into my poems and process.

  • I’ve been collecting words for a long time. My list poem about walking features just some of the many words for walking, one of my favorite pastimes. A favorite walk of mine and my husband’s is the nearby Emerson-Thoreau Amble. Dear friends Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson enjoyed walking together, and one of their favorite woodland walks was the 1.7 mile path that began behind Emerson’s home and ended at nearby Walden Pond.  You can read more about this walk here. The “good friends” in my poem was inspired by these famous good friends.
  • Here in New England we are only just beginning to see true signs of spring in our gardens. “Sprinkled” is the perfect way to describe the hints of color beginning to crop up here and there.
  • The photo in my spring poem is of a long, narrow garden bed that runs alongside my driveway. It makes me happy when I pull in and see some sprinkles of color.
  • When the sun is shining, and there is a light breeze blowing, the intoxicating perfume from my early spring bulbs in bloom wafts in through my open windows. It is truly delicious!

One full week of National Poetry Month to go, gang. If you are looking to share a little poetry wonder with your students, check out this Padlet of all the poetry-related wonders on Wonderopolis. Perhaps they’ll find a bit of inspiration here!

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And introducing….

2019 Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem

On April 1, the Poetry Friday family launched the 7th annual Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem organized by author/poet, Irene Latham. (Click here to learn more.) Many of us have signed up to provide a line for the 2019 poem. Author/poet Matt Forrest Esenwine kicked things off with some familiar “found” phrases merged to get us going. Today’s line comes from Heidi Mordhorst at My Juicy Little Universe. Participants are having fun lifting favorite song lyrics to create the next line in the poem. I was excited to provide the 14th line on Sunday, April 14th. I hope you’ll join us to see what happens! Here’s the itinerary for the poem.

April

1 Matt @Radio, Rhythm and Rhyme

2 Kat @Kathryn Apel

3 Kimberly @KimberlyHutmacherWrites

4 Jone @DeoWriter

5 Linda @TeacherDance

6 Tara @Going to Walden

7 Ruth @thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown

8 Mary Lee @A Year of Reading

9 Rebecca @Rebecca Herzog

10 Janet F. @Live Your Poem

11 Dani @Doing the Work that Matters

12 Margaret @Reflections on the Teche

13 Doraine @Dori Reads

14 Christie @Wondering and Wandering

15 Robyn @Life on the Deckle Edge

16 Carol @Beyond LiteracyLink

17 Amy @The Poem Farm

18 Linda @A Word Edgewise

19 Heidi @my juicy little universe

20 Buffy @Buffy’s Blog

21 Michelle @Michelle Kogan

22 Catherine @Reading to the Core

23 Penny @a penny and her jots

24 Tabatha @The Opposite of Indifference

25 Jan @Bookseestudio

26 Linda @Write Time

27 Sheila @Sheila Renfro

28 Liz @Elizabeth Steinglass

29 Irene @Live Your Poem

30 Donna @Mainely Write

Day 16: Skinny Poetry #NaPoWriMo #playwithpoetryNPM #SOL19

PLAYING WITH POETRY (1)

My #NaPoWriMo Poem-A-Day project is Playing With Poetry. I am tagging along with Margaret Simon, Jone MacCulloch, Molly Hogan, and Mary Lee Hahn. We will be playing with Haikubes, Magnetic Poetry, Metaphor Dice, and Paint Chip Poetry (I raided Home Depot).  I’m even throwing in nail polish color names as inspiration, just for fun! Play along, if you’d like! We are using the Twitter hashtag #playwithpoetryNPM to see what poetic mischief everyone is getting into.

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No need to turn to playful prompts today.

A peek into my poem and process:

  • The world watched with horror and sadness yesterday as the magnificent and beloved Cathedrale Notre-Dame de Paris burned for hours on end. I visited there in January 1986 while studying abroad my junior year in college. While that was 33 years ago, and I have not managed to track down my photos as of yet, the memory of that cold winter day, with the wind blowing off the Seine, will linger indelibly in my memory.
  • I again turned to Word Swag to create my final poetic image. There were many photos of Notre Dame to select from. I opted for a calm, peaceful, and contemplative indoor image rather than an iconic outdoor shot of the now painfully disfigured grand dame.
  • When rolling the dice to select a text layout, the final selection appeared to show my words drifting upwards to the heavens, sadly reminiscent of the history that drifted upwards with the flames.
  • My poem is in the skinny form — 11 lines, 1st and 11th identical phrases, 2nd, 6th, and 10th repeating, all lines apart from 1 and 11 individual words. More details about this form can be found here.

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And now for….

2019 Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem

On April 1, the Poetry Friday family launched the 7th annual Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem organized by author/poet, Irene Latham. (Click here to learn more.) Many of us have signed up to provide a line for the 2019 poem. Author/poet Matt Forrest Esenwine kicked things off with some familiar “found” phrases merged to get us going. Today’s line comes from my Wonderopolis Wonder Buddy, Carol Varsalona. You may find her line here. Our little poem is now waltzing in the waves. Participants are having fun song lyrics. I was excited to provide the 14th line on April 14th. You can read it here. I hope you’ll join us to see what happens next! Here’s the itinerary for the rest of the poem.

April

1 Matt @Radio, Rhythm and Rhyme

2 Kat @Kathryn Apel

3 Kimberly @KimberlyHutmacherWrites

4 Jone @DeoWriter

5 Linda @TeacherDance

6 Tara @Going to Walden

7 Ruth @thereisnosuchthingasagodforsakentown

8 Mary Lee @A Year of Reading

9 Rebecca @Rebecca Herzog

10 Janet F. @Live Your Poem

11 Dani @Doing the Work that Matters

12 Margaret @Reflections on the Teche

13 Doraine @Dori Reads

14 Christie @Wondering and Wandering

15 Robyn @Life on the Deckle Edge

16 Carol @Beyond LiteracyLink

17 Amy @The Poem Farm

18 Linda @A Word Edgewise

19 Heidi @my juicy little universe

20 Buffy @Buffy’s Blog

21 Michelle @Michelle Kogan

22 Catherine @Reading to the Core

23 Penny @a penny and her jots

24 Tabatha @The Opposite of Indifference

25 Jan @Bookseestudio

26 Linda @Write Time

27 Sheila @Sheila Renfro

28 Liz @Elizabeth Steinglass

29 Irene @Live Your Poem

30 Donna @Mainely Write

Rainbow and Equation Poem #PoetryFriday

Happy Poetry Friday, all! Poetess and author Laura Purdie Salas is hosting this week’s gathering on her blog, Writing the World for Kids.  Won’t you join us there?

Equation Poem

Related to her new book, Snowman – Cold = Puddle: Spring Equations, Laura has a fun, quick writing challenge for us this week: write an equation poem. What fun! She’s even set up a Padlet to collect them. My class’ participation in Global School Play Day 2019 on Wednesday inspired my offering.

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On Tuesday morning, the most magnificent rainbow appeared in the sky just as families in cars and buses filled with excited children were making their way to school. Cars pulled over, parents and staff snapped pictures as children squealed with joy. What a way to start another day of learning and growing together!

With this image still vivid in my memory, I scrambled for pen and paper when my students were safely delivered to PE class. I scribbled down words, thoughts, and feelings that came to mind, knowing that there was a poem amongst those faded pastel hues. Later that day, I curled up with a cup of tea and my scribbles. Wondering what more I might add to my ideas, I searched Wonderopolis (a great source for poetic inspiration) for a wonder about rainbows. I found Wonder of the Day #116: Why Do Rainbows Appear? and mined a few more descriptors and facts from the text. After some gentle nudges, a rainbow appeared. 

Rainbow (3)

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Thanks for wondering and wandering a bit with me today. I hope you’ll join us on this Poetry Friday by posting a bit of poetry — your’s or someone else’s — and leaving a comment here or there. Thank you for hosting, Laura!

“Some may wonder why,” a golden shovel, and a challenge reminder #PoetryFriday

Happy Poetry Friday, everyone! Molly at Nix the Comfort Zone is our lovely hostess this week. I had the great good fortune to meet Molly IRL, as they say, a couple of weeks ago at Heinemann’s annual teacher tour in Portsmouth, NH. Molly and I have been chatting through comments here on PF, on our Tuesday Slices, and in the TeachWrite Facebook community for some time. It was fun to finally meet face to face, albeit for just a short time…this time!

Molly has been crafting the most gorgeous sonnet for some time now, and it’s finally ready for it’s debut. Don’t miss it! You’ll be swept away by The Solace of the Ocean.

One of my goals for the summer was to try different types of writing (tipping my hat to you, Jennifer Laffin!), including new poetry forms. A golden shovel was on my hit list — taking a line from someone else’s poem and then using each word in that line as the last word of each line of the new poem. But which poem to borrow a line from?

I’ve been talking a lot about notebooks this summer with the goddess of writing notebooks, Michelle Haseltine, the TeachWrite community, and on other social media venues, so notebooks it is! Who better to borrow from then Ralph Fletcher, one of the pied pipers of the students-using-writing-notebooks community. His poem, It’s a Place, was the perfect fit. (Click the link to read his original text.)

So here it is, my first golden shovel, borrowing from Ralph’s first line, “Why am I keeping this notebook.”

Some may wonder why (Golden Shovel)
Some may wonder why
But its who I am
Whiling away the hours, my pen and I
Words sounds, feelings, oddities, life, stored away for safe keeping
Ready and waiting for a time such as this
To be quarried like gemstones from my notebook

Poetry challenge reminder: I’m hosting Poetry Friday next week, on August 17. I threw a bird-related poem challenge out last week to anyone willing to fly along. Your poem can be about any bird you like, or birds in general. It can be in any form you like. Just wing it! If you are stumped, take a look at all the bird-related wonders on Wonderopolis.org. Choose one and create a “found” poem by highlighting key words, or why not try a “blackout poem,” crossing out/covering up unused words.

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Thanks for visiting and join us for some Poetry Friday fun!

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Wonders of Science #NationalPoetryMonth #NaPoWriMo

Happy National Poetry Month! This month I am tagging along with poet/author Amy Ludwig VanDerwater during what has become her annual NPM Project. You can click here to learn more about this straight from Amy! This year she is writing and sharing a new poem every day, each highlighting a different poetic technique, but keeping the same subject. Her challenge, 1 Subject 30 Ways, is also a bit of an informal book study and master class, as she’s using her fall 2017 release Poems Are Teachers (Heinemann) as her guide. Join us!

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Today’s poetic technique chosen by Amy is to be inspired by science. My subject is, and will be all month-long, vernal pools. The inspiration for today’s poem came straight from the “Find Ideas in Science” section of Amy’s book. A resource she suggests are the “Wonder of the Day” articles on Wonderopolis.org. Last year my Kindergarten class and I submitted a wonder to Wonderopolis and this winter it was published — Wonder of the Day #2105: What Is a Vernal Pool? (Click here to read more.)

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fairy shrimp, rare flowers
survive harshest conditions
find homes in vernal pools
wetlands, grassland areas
climatic conditions
vernal ponds
ephemeral pools
temporary
seasonal
change
winter
rains arrive
accumulate
small as small puddles
large as shallow lake
bacteria, protozoa, algae
multiply rapidly
food source
aquatic invertebrates
eggs resting, waiting
all-you-can-eat buffet
frogs, snakes, birds, mammals
ecosystem
spring
species grow
flower
bursts of color
summer
dry
disappear
reawaken when winter rains return
amazing adaptations

Using the text from this WOTD, I created a blackout poem, highlighting the text I wished to keep and slightly blacking out what I did not wish to use. As is true with all of my poems for this challenge, it remains a draft that I will return to. For now, the visual image of the final text appeals to me. It somehow reflects the ebb and flow of the vernal pool life cycle.

I hope you’ve been following along the journey of the 2018 KidLitosphere Progressive Poem, a fun annual collaborative project lovingly begun in 2012 by poet/author Irene Latham. This poem has magically, and quite literally this year, been growing right before our eyes daily during the month of April. This year we are following along the journey of Jasmine, a seed, and her companions Moon and Owl. Jasmine, from a long line of poet’s jasmine, began is beginning to make her way in the world and find her poetic voice. The process has been fascinating to follow and I was excited to dive in for the first time with line eighteen. I hope you will follow Jasmine’s journey for the remainder of our Progressive Poem month by clicking on the blogs in the list below.  I can’t wait to see what happens next!

April

2 Jane at Raincity Librarian
4 Michelle at Today’s Little Ditty
Jan at bookseedstudio
6 Irene at Live Your Poem
7 Linda at TeacherDance
Janet F. at Live Your Poem
11 Brenda at Friendly Fairy Tales
12 Carol at Beyond LiteracyLink
13 Linda at A Word Edgewise
15 Donna at Mainely Write
16 Sarah at Sarah Grace Tuttle
18 Christie at Wondering and Wandering
19 Michelle at Michelle Kogan
20 Linda at Write Time
23 Amy at The Poem Farm
24 Mary Lee at A Year of Reading
26 Renee at No Water River
27 Buffy at Buffy’s Blog
28 Kat at Kat’s Whiskers
29 April at Teaching Authors
30 Doraine at Dori Reads

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This post is part of my personal National Poetry Month celebration. I hope you’ll join me in sharing your favorite poetic gems throughout the month of April whether they are written by you, your students, or another poet.

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I found it in the vernal pool! #SOLC18 #PoetryFriday

Time for one final Slice of Life and Poetry Friday mashup for 2018! This post also serves as a bit of a warmup for National Poetry Month, which launches on Sunday. The annual month-long Slice of Life writing challenge is organized by Two Writing Teachers. And this week, Heidi Mordhurst is hosting Poetry Friday over at My Juicy Little Universe. I hope you’ll stop by there as well and learn about this year’s Progressive Poem, lovingly begun in 2012 by Irene Latham. It will magically be growing right before our eyes daily during the month of April. It’s fascinating and this year I’m diving in for the first time with a line right in the middle of the month — April 18th. Stay tuned and check in on Sunday to see how Elizabeth Steinglass kicks things off.

First up, a poem found in the text of an article about vernal pools in Mass Audubon’s spring issue of “Explore.” Vernal pools are very much on my mind today as it is 50 degrees early in the morning and raining just west of Boston. These are ideal conditions for amphibians to breed in local vernal pools. As some of you know, because I write about it frequently (sorry!), our science curriculum in Kindergarten in my district focuses on several natural communities abutting our school property — the vernal pool community and the organic farm community, with its farm stand and chicken coop. We begin teaching our Kindergarten scientists about the vernal pool community on the first day of school, but at that point, most of its inhabitants have moved on. In fact, the vernal pool is often no longer there when we take the first of our monthly walks. We patiently wait throughout the long New England winter for things to change, and they finally have. This magical forest community is coming to life once again.

Vernal Pools
Waiting for spring
Spectacular, natural
Vernal pool season
Symphony of calls
Temporary, isolated
Spring rain
Woodland hollows, low meadows
Breeding habitat
Warming spring days
First soaking rain
Big Night
Chorus of wood frogs quacking
Tiny fairy shrimp eggs survive
Spotted salamanders congress
Spring peepers sharp, peeping calls
Important
Protected

You can read the original text here. And to listen to a majestic chorus of wood frogs, click here.

And my second offering for the day is an acrostic tribute to the Slice of Life Challenge, which sadly wraps up tomorrow with our final posts. It’s tough going at times, but I wouldn’t give up participating in this community for anything.

Slice of Life Acrostic

To learn more about acrostic poems, and perhaps share with your students during National Poetry Month, check out Wonderopolis’ “Wonder of the Day” #169: What Is an Acrostic Poem?

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If you want to take a peek at the Padlet of writing ideas I’ve created, I’m happy to share. It grows every day.

 

 

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