Kicking a clunker down the road #PoetryFriday

It’s Poetry Friday and Linda Mitchell is our hostess this week for the poetry roundup on her blog, A Word Edgewise. Perhaps you’ll join us?

Linda’s giving away clunkers — lines, thoughts and bits of poems — discarded or abandoned from her writing journals. Do any interest you? One drew me in — “As she walks the road…” It’s my first day of summer vacation, so I thought I’ll let it simmer for a bit and see what, if anything, would happen

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I adore northern cardinals, and it seems I’m a bit of a cardinal magnet lately. One has been visiting me outside my classroom every afternoon this week, his familiar chip chip chip flowing in and out of my open window. And then, as I returned home today, I was visited by yet another cardinal. Has he followed me home?

And now for my clunker. I’m giving away “Do you think they talk?” I’m working on something with that as the opening line, but it’s not ready…yet. I’d love to see what someone else does with it, too!

Thanks for hosting this week, Linda. Bring on the poetry!

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I Know It’s Almost Summer #PoetryFriday

It’s Poetry Friday and Michelle Kogan is our hostess this week for the poetry roundup on her blog. Perhaps you’ll join us? She’s featuring our Poet Laureate, Tracy K. Smith, this week. I’m hooked on her podcast The Slowdown. Are you?

At the end of March, during the Slice of Life Challenge, Lynne Dorfman shared a poem inspired by Eileen Spinelli’s I Know It’s Autumn. You may read her poem, A Summer Counting Poem here. I tucked Lynne’s post away for a rainy writing day, and it has now inspired me to write my own I Know It’s Almost Summer poem, now that I have 10 more days of school left.

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I know it’s almost summer
because robins greet us each morning at dawn
and light lingers longer each day
I know it’s almost summer
because I am restless
mountains and oceans beckon me
I know it’s almost summer
because books wait patiently to be read
and my writing notebook lays open ready to capture my thoughts
I know it’s almost summer
because porch rockers wait patiently for our return
at the end of the day

My poem is most definitely a draft and I look forward to playing around with it, now that it’s almost summer.

Thanks for hosting this week, Michelle. Bring on the poetry!

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Borrowing a Line from NSN #PoetryFriday

It’s Poetry Friday and Mary Lee Hahn is our hostess this week for the poetry roundup on A Year of Reading. Perhaps you’ll join us? She’s offered up the work of brilliant poet Naomi Shihab Nye as a possible theme for anyone interested. Just a couple of weeks ago, the Poetry Foundation named Ms. Nye their Young People’s Poet Laureate, the first Arab-American to receive this great honor. Huzzah!

After reading this article about Ms. Nye’s appointment in Texas Monthly, one line jumped out at me to be borrowed for a line in a poem — “there’s no place that poetry doesn’t live.” Now that I’m writing regularly in my writing notebook (thank you, Teach Write!), I find myself scribbling down so much that I see, hear, feel, notice, and wonder about. These bits and pieces of seemingly nothing odds and ends continue to amaze me at how they often become something.

There's no place that poetry doesn't live

Thanks for hosting this week, Mary Lee. Bring on the poetry!

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Robin Nest Pi-Ku #PoetryFriday

It’s Poetry Friday and my fellow Kindergarten teacher and poet, Dani Burtsfield, is our hostess this week for the poetry roundup. Perhaps you’ll join us?

Last week Margaret Simon shared some wonderful nature Pi-Ku she and her students created. (You may read their work here.) Never having written a Pi-Ku (syllable counts matching 3.14159265359), and loving a challenge, I thought I’d give it a try. My inspiration is the ever-changing robin nest in my holly bush which I wrote about here. Two weeks ago I discovered lovely eggs, laid one a day, and this week they are beginning to hatch, one a day. Yesterday I snuck up to snap this picture when I saw mom leave on a food run. Today she was watching like a hawk from, so I’m keeping my distance!

nestling knows
— Christie Wyman, 2019 (draft)

My Pi-Ku made it to 3/1/4/1/5/9/2. How far might you go with a Pi-Ku?

Thanks for hosting this week, Dani. Bring on the poetry!

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Instructions to a Kindergarten Writer’s Notebook #PoetryFriday #notebookday #nationalnotebookday

It’s Poetry Friday and my poetry playmate Margaret Simon is our gracious hostess this week for the poetry roundup. Perhaps you’ll join us? Margaret is has some lovely (and fun!) Pi-Ku for us to enjoy. I confess I had never heard of Pi-Ku (syllable count 3.14…….) before. Can’t wait to try!

Two weeks ago, at the end of an interview with Elizabeth Steinglass, Michelle Heidenrich Barnes threw out a challenge to poets one and all — write a poem giving instructions to an inanimate object about how to do its job. Elizabeth has a terrific poem in her new book, Soccerverse, that does just that — Instructions for the Field. You can read the interview here.

Seeing as yesterday was National Notebook Day, I thought I’d dive into my notebook and tackle this month’s challenge with a poem giving instructions to my Kindergarten writers’ notebooks. Here are two sneak peeks inside notebooks in my classroom.

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Here’s what I came up with.

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Have you taken on this month’s challenge? If so, why not add it to the Padlet created to collect these wonderful instruction poems.

And just for fun, here are two other notebook and writing-related poems to share.

Some may wonder why (Golden Shovel)
A Golden Shovel using “Why am I keeping this notebook” as an anchor line.
Brave writer
A wee bit of free verse written with my Kindergarten writers in mind.

Thanks for hosting this week, Margaret. Bring on the poetry!

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Dear momma bird #PoetryFriday

It’s Poetry Friday and Elizabeth Steinglass is our gracious hostess this week for the poetry roundup. Perhaps you’ll join us? Elizabeth is celebrating her new book, Soccerverse: Poems about Soccer. How fun, and congratulations, Elizabeth!

It’s spring, so bring on the robins!

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This week I discovered a robin’s nest in my backyard. On Tuesday there were two eggs and on Wednesday there were three! Robins lay a clutch of 3-4 eggs, just one each day, so yesterday should have been egg number 4 or the start of momma keeping them toasty warm until their debut in about two weeks. I wasn’t able to check yesterday, but this afternoon I found four and no momma. I’m going to keep my distance for a bit and let her get settled to do her important work.

In their honor, and for Mother’s Day, I wrote a poem in letter form to mark the occasions.

Dear momma bird

If you’d like to learn more about writing letter poems, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater has wonderful advice for you and your students at The Poem Farm. And, if you adore robins, there are many delightful poems about them. You may find a list here.

Thanks for hosting this week, Elizabeth. Bring on the poetry!

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A Wonder-inspired Hummingbird Haiku #PoetryFriday #BirdDay

It’s Poetry Friday and Jama Rattigan of Jama’s Alphabet Soup has all the poetry goodness being offered up today. Perhaps you’ll join us? Jama has a lovely May Day celebration waiting for you.

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— Christie Wyman, 2019 (draft)

I’m celebrating Bird Day (not to be confused with National Bird Day) a day early this year. As I write this post, I am awaiting the arrival of my first hummingbird. My feeder has been up for three weeks now, as these tiny creatures have been spotted in the area. Each time I pass the window that looks out upon the feeder, I can’t help but take a glance.

I wanted to create a new poem in honor of these tiny beauties, so for inspiration I turned to Wonderopolis’ Wonder of the Day #556: Do Hummingbirds Really Hum? Several poetic Wonder Words were waiting there for me! Word Swag offered up lots of fabulous hummingbird images, and I was lucky enough to find one that demonstrates that unique pendulum swinging motion the hummingbird uses while it’s hovering. There’s an amazing video on the Wonderopolis page of someone hand-feeding a hummer! Don’t miss it!

And while we are awaiting their grand entrance, here are two of my earlier hummingbird-inspired poems.

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Thanks for hosting this week, Jama!

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